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Massimo Cellino: How Passion Can Backfire.

Nothing describes an owner better than passion and expertise. But has Massimo Cellino taken it too far?

What future lies ahead of Mr. Cellino?
What future lies ahead of Mr. Cellino?
Ben Hoskins/Getty Images

Ever since Massimo took over Leeds United, every season has had it's very own little scandal.

Surprisingly, most of them came around September. Maybe mr. Cellino is not doing well with Summer coming to an end? I mean, he is Italian, he is used to warm weather etc and on the other hand, Autumn in the UK is preeetty depressing. But that is not the reason to cause so much drama.

His love to football can be seen in his statement after ByramGate (thanks for the clever name, WeAreLeedsUnited):

"He maybe thinks he deserves to be in a bigger team and a bigger club, and maybe he's right. But when I hear that a player from Leeds, with his agent, that he thinks that Leeds is not big enough for him, that he wants something bigger, I feel really embarrassed."

Another interesting thing can be take out of those words. He feels connected to Leeds and really sees the club as something great.

It can be easily seen in the way he wants the club to develop. Polishing the diamonds from the academy and selling them for a high price is not the way to go for Cellino. The way Byram is being treated is only proving that point. He would rather see him go for a lower price in January or as a free agent in Summer, than pay more money just to keep a young, talented player, who thinks Leeds are to small of a club for him.

And I, myself, think that there is a method in this madness. I certainly appreciate him being so passionate about his beloved club. Sadly, there isn't much room for this kind of passion in nowadays football. While players and coaches with this kind of passion are slowly becoming a thing of the past, club owners are starting to look more like politicians. It is neccessary to be calm, steady and most of all diplomatic. Being diplomatic and passionate at the same time is almost impossible. And that is why Cellino has difficulties since day one.

But for me, I think that there is room for development. It's better to teach a passionate person how to be diplomatic, than to teach a born diplomat how to be passionate.

Passion is the key word here, that is why I repeated it so many times. I believe that from Cellino's passion, after so many wrongs, rights will start coming in numbers.